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I was following someone else’s guide and they said you should have a static front page, but I feel like I would be getting more views and more clicks if I had the opposite ie; my latest blogs on the homepage. I also checked my stats and when I link to an article/review people stay longer. When I link to the home page they don’t stay as long AND a higher bounce rate. My bounce rate for the homepage is literally 3,000 in the past month. They hit that homepage and stay for around 7 minutes which means most are probably reading the static page, but then they just… leave.

You wouldn’t install the same Google Analytics code on every single website you own right? Of course not, because you wouldn’t be able to tell how much traffic each of your websites were receiving individually. So the same thing can be said for tracking the money you make on your websites (and yet people still tell me they use only one Amazon tracking ID for all of their websites /facepalm). In the past I’ve gone so far as to create 15 different tracking ID’s for use on a single website.

The shipping thing drives me nuts. It takes significantly longer for me to get anything from Amazon (WEEKS if I choose free shipping) than everyone else. Why? Because I live in a high crime area and want everything shipped to my p.o. box. I recently placed and order and chose “free shipping” because the delivery date was one day earlier than had I chosen the paid ship option – until I got to the end, whereupon my new ship date was an additional FIVE DAYS later. Get a p.o. box and try it and you’ll quickly see I’m not lying. We’re punished. Amazon whines a lot about combating thievery (let us in your house, let us in your car) but they’re strangely silent on p.o. boxes, the absolute safest option available to anyone. What’s THAT about?! I work at the USPS plant where my p.o. box is and my box is literally twenty steps from where the Amazon packages are processed – if Amazon would just ship the ****** thing out! Keep checking my phone but, nope, it STILL hasn’t shipped. Btw, USPS and FedEx have a business relationship so they can’t blame it on that. For this reason, Prime was a joke so I cancelled. And because Amazon always wanted additional money from me for every movie I wanted to watch. Kind of defeats the point. Couldn’t see any benefit to having it.
To avoid copyright violations, Amazon does not return the computer-readable text of the book. Instead, it returns a picture of the matching page, instructs the web browser to disable printing and puts limits on the number of pages in a book a single user can access. Additionally, customers can purchase online access to some of the same books via the "Amazon Upgrade" program.[citation needed]

Good comment Jason, at some time in the future Amazon may decide they have so much market share they don't need affiliates anyway. I mean, if you're just sending them people who are already Amazon customers there's not so much benefit there for them. Or they may decide to only work with select HIGH QUALITY affiliates and the average "affiliate site" owner will not be chosen.
In 2000, U.S. toy retailer Toys "R" Us entered into a 10-year agreement with Amazon, valued at $50 million per-year plus a cut of sales, under which Toys "R" Us would be the exclusive supplier of toys and baby products on the service, and the chain's website would redirect to Amazon's Toys & Games category. In 2004, Toys "R" Us sued Amazon, claiming that due to a perceived lack of variety in Toys "R" Us stock, Amazon had knowingly allowed third-party sellers to offer items on the service in categories that Toys "R" Us had been granted exclusivity. In 2006, a court ruled in favor of Toys "R" Us, giving it the right to unwind its agreement with Amazon and establish its own independent e-commerce website. The company was later awarded $51 million in damages.[83][84][85]
Ibrahin, who works a 12-hour night shift from 5:30 pm to 6 am, says she’s worked about 20 different jobs since moving to the US as a 16-year-old in 2004. These jobs include working a fishing boat in the middle of the ocean off the coast of Alaska, cleaning Chicago’s O’Hare Airport, and packing at a Target warehouse. Her current job at Amazon, she says, has been her hardest.

You have the option of signing up for the individual plan, which is great if you plan on selling 40 or less items per month, or the professional plan if you plan on selling more. With the individual plan, you pay a flat $0.99 selling fee per item sold, plus a referral fee in the 8%–15% range of the product's selling price. With the professional plan, you pay a flat $39.99/month with no per item selling fee, but still have to pay the referral fee.
Amazon Flex pays its delivery drivers between $18 and $25 per hour. The pay for each shift is fixed, meaning you make the same amount per hour, but the amount each block pays will vary based on your region, the time of day and the number of packages you can carry at one time. Some drivers have noticed that block payments tend to increase during bad weather, around the holidays and in the evenings.
By completing small online tasks via Amazon Mechanical Turk, you have the potential to earn a decent chunk of change. Examples of popular tasks include looking at an image and describing it in 10 words or less for a 10 cent payment, and a semi-detailed product review for a quick $2.50. While many of the tasks are low-paying, they can add up fairly quickly if you have the patience to wade through the riff-raff to find the better paying tasks. If you work at a job that has regular short delays — a customer service rep jumps to mind — Turk could make for a great way to fill those breaks with tasks that pay.
In any case, you will not earn advertising fees for (a) any purchase that, after expiration of the applicable 24-hour window, is added to a customer’s shopping cart, purchased by a customer via Amazon’s 1-Click feature, or is streamed or downloaded by a customer, even if the customer previously followed your Associates link to Amazon.co.uk or (b) an purchase order that is cancelled or returned.
Wow, great ideas! I never thought to link to a candle! My blog is about diabetes so I’ve never thought to link to common things I use daily but that’s genius! I love how she added the candle at the end as a side note almost. I guess I’ve never thought to look on Amazon for candles because I go to Bath and Body Works for those. I’m updating my best posts today! Plus I’m going to do some Pinterest posts for my affiliate number for your book which is a GREAT book!

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That was my initial reaction when I heard the news here. Gael , Mark and Perrin of Authority Hacker company involved in a stringent audit By Amazon Associates with risk of getting banned! The legalities of potential lawsuit liability against a huge online retailer, aka “Amazon” actually forces Amazon to go after a big fish in the Affiliate Marketing game, namely “Authority Hacker”.
My advice for beginners – especially beginner bloggers with new sites – focus on your site content and traffic for a while, then add your Amazon links once you have a little traffic. So many beginners focus on making money from their links and sacrifice their content building in the process. Without good content and traffic you won’t make much anyways.
In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart as the most valuable retailer in the United States by market capitalization.[12] Amazon is the third most valuable public company in the United States (behind Apple and Microsoft),[13] the largest Internet company by revenue in the world, and after Walmart, the second largest employer in the United States.[14] In 2017, Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market for $13.4 billion, which vastly increased Amazon's presence as a brick-and-mortar retailer.[15] The acquisition was interpreted by some as a direct attempt to challenge Walmart's traditional retail stores.[16]
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