In the summer of 2014, I came across a few blog posts and podcast episodes focused on the topic of selling private label products through Amazon’s FBA program. I was aware of the possibility to sell private label products, and I was aware that third-party sellers could sell their products on Amazon, but I had never thought about the power that exists when these two are combined.

You wouldn’t install the same Google Analytics code on every single website you own right? Of course not, because you wouldn’t be able to tell how much traffic each of your websites were receiving individually. So the same thing can be said for tracking the money you make on your websites (and yet people still tell me they use only one Amazon tracking ID for all of their websites /facepalm). In the past I’ve gone so far as to create 15 different tracking ID’s for use on a single website.


The point of the service is to encourage you to leave reviews of the product. This typically is reserved for newly released products. They don’t have a huge amount of products, but they are at great prices. for instance, you can get a 3-piece stainless steel barbecue set for only $5. That’s about 80% off the price it would sell on Amazon. As noted, you get the price because you have to submit a product review on Amazon. Companies are spending money to reduce the price in order to get reviews. You have to be honest in your review.
Choose products carefully. Don't promote something you wouldn't buy or don't like just to make money. It will backfire and cause you to lose credibility with your website visitors. People are more likely to buy products you personally recommend. If you don't have experience with the product, be sure to check out reviews to see what other people's experience with it is.
Thanks a lot for those tips. I bought your course but found that the module for finding a niche cannot be easily applied for the following reasons: 1) domain (com, net, org) that match exact keywords are almost taken by someone else; 2) even if you can find an exact match keyword domain, changes are there are other competitors building similar niche review sites, simply adding good quality articles and build links with some social book marking do not seem to work well; 3) can you elaborate in details how to do the SEO for a specific niche using real exams (e.g., if you say social bookmarking, can you tell us how to find those sites or even provide a list of sites; if you use blog comments, can you walk thru the process to find good quality blog that accept comments with “do follow” etc
Update: I used to recommend carousel style Amazon ads, but they don’t exist anymore. When I used them they converted about 3 times better than static style Amazon banner ads. I suggest using Native Shopping Ads instead which is essentially a replacement to the carousel style ads but allows for greater flexibility. You can display products by recommendation from the content, by search or with other options. Here is what the a Native Shopping Ad looks like for the keyword search “Chris Guthrie” Amazon displays the Kindle books I’ve written:
Amazon has fought back against unionization campaigns in the past. When a small group of maintenance and repair technicians moved to unionize at a Delaware Amazon warehouse in 2014, the company hired a law firm that specializes in opposing organized labor. The employees eventually voted not to join the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.
Protect critical data, applications, and IT systems that are running in the AWS Cloud or in your on-premises environment without incurring the expense of a second physical site. With Amazon S3 storage, S3 Cross-Region Replication, and other AWS compute, networking, and database services, you can create DR architectures in order to quickly and easily recover from outages caused by natural disasters, system failures, and human errors.
Hey Chris, ok I have an affiliate site with 2000 products. Is their a plugin or something to let me know if a product is no longer available. Or is their a plugin that checks links everyday automatically to let me know if their is a problem. Nothing worse than clicking a link to find out the page is no longer available. I’m not about to click all my links to check either.
I should finish this review, though, by saying that most traders lose money in stocks. Unless you're so obsessed with stocks that you're willing to put in thousands of hours (just like any highly competitive skill) before you are successful, I'd recommend just buying a mutual fund instead. It's a lot less hassle, and unless you become an elite trader, your returns will likely be comparable over a long enough period of time.
One of the things I’ve done over the past two years is track the methods I use to make money with Amazon by tracking IDs as well as keeping track of other things I’ve done while building up my Amazon websites. I initially published my findings in two blog posts early last year when I first launched this blog and even today they are still among the most popular posts. Now it’s been over a year and today I’m providing an updated list of information including several new tips that I’ve learned since that time.

You have the option of signing up for the individual plan, which is great if you plan on selling 40 or less items per month, or the professional plan if you plan on selling more. With the individual plan, you pay a flat $0.99 selling fee per item sold, plus a referral fee in the 8%–15% range of the product's selling price. With the professional plan, you pay a flat $39.99/month with no per item selling fee, but still have to pay the referral fee.
I have about 4 authority style sites and the rest are all mini ones. I like the money the mini’s can make but there isn’t any attractive exit strategy with those so that’s why I like to do a little of both, but I believe authority style sites have the biggest upside. As for income split I’d have to go back through all the tracking data but I’d peg it somewhat in favor of authority sites (before I sold one of my largest ones)

"The longer you're here, and the more you build, and the more you collaborate, the more you become personally passionate about our mission," says Mike Bundy, who started out in a temp job stacking pallets at Amazon's first fulfillment center in 1997. Today, he manages a 300-person software organization. "I feel like a founder of the company. I feel a great deal of personal pride in what we’ve done."
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