“Every time I walk through those doors, I am filled this dread that tonight is going to be the night that I get fired,” she says. “When you take a job at a warehouse, you have to be mentally and physically prepared for a certain kind of work, but I have never felt threatened by a workplace like this before,” she says. “I want to keep this job to provide for my family, and I am also working as hard as I can, but you can’t live under this type of pressure. The way Amazon pushes people is not moral.” (In a statement to Vox, an Amazon spokesperson touted the facility’s “excellent pay” and “comprehensive benefits.”)

Good comment Jason, at some time in the future Amazon may decide they have so much market share they don't need affiliates anyway. I mean, if you're just sending them people who are already Amazon customers there's not so much benefit there for them. Or they may decide to only work with select HIGH QUALITY affiliates and the average "affiliate site" owner will not be chosen.
There are two ways to find the Affiliate link to a specific product. You can use the grey Amazon Associates toolbar (also called Site Stripe) on the top edge of the browser window to create an Affiliate link for the currently visited shop page. You will need to be signed into Amazon Associates for the Site Stripe to appear, and then visit the respective product page.
It's easy to forget these days, but there was a time when Amazon didn't – and couldn't – promise that an order would arrive by a certain date. Mike helped change that. "We totally overhauled the way we make promises on the website," he says. "We got rid of the 'usually ships in 24 hours' messaging. We developed the capability to make these aggressive delivery estimates and keep them. In many ways, this was what Prime was born of."
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