As a practicing Muslim, Ibrahin tries to pray five times a day. But because Amazon has the warehouse associates working on a strict hourly packing quota, she says she cannot take a prayer break. Associates are pressured to “make rate,” with the rate number increasing and decreasing depending on the season’s demand. The warehouse’s current packing rate is 240 boxes an hour, Ibrahin says, but it’s gone as high as 400. Associates are penalized if they fall behind this rate; they can get a write-up from a manager if they are too slow, which can lead to them being terminated.
I spent around $2,000 on the creation and subsequent modifications of Azon Theme. It’s basically a theme with a ton of different options that has evolved based on my own testing and the feedback from members of my Niche Profit Course (all customers get Azon Theme and the upgrades for free). You can watch a brief video which covers some of the Azon Theme options here
Small-scale bloggers like Robey won’t be the only ones hit by the rate changes. Publications like The Wirecutter have built thriving businesses entirely on affiliate payments, which are made by vendors like Amazon whenever a referred customer buys a product. Though a number of companies offer similar programs, Amazon’s affiliate system is the most lucrative, and auto-tagged product links have become a significant part of many online businesses’ revenue. (That includes The Verge, which auto-generates affiliate links in some cases.) Though the relationship can be lucrative, it’s also entirely subject to Amazon’s discretion — and as Robey and others are learning, it can often change with little to no warning.
FBA or Fulfillment by Amazon allows anyone to sell goods on the Amazon platform and store inventory in their fulfillment centers. Simply put, you buy items you want to sell, and Amazon will list them, store them and ship them to your customers. They also handle most customer service inquires, refunds and returns. Interestingly, more than 40% of Amazon’s total sales come from third-party sellers.
To use the site, just put in the URL of the product you want to buy off Amazon, so something like http://www.amazon.com/Mohu-Leaf-Amplified-Indoor-Antenna/dp/B00APPDX86/. This will then give you a run down of the pricing history of the product. It gives you valuable insight into how the product has been priced over time and if the current price is in line with those changes. Her is a graph for the product example above.

I thought it couldn’t get any better, but now Amazon has introduced same day shipping in our area. I did try it out and it was pretty cool. I ordered in the morning and the item was there that night. Most of the time they charge extra, but the item I bought was free that same day. This service is only available to Amazon Prime members. If you’re not one, why not try out a free, 30-day trial?


Choose products carefully. Don't promote something you wouldn't buy or don't like just to make money. It will backfire and cause you to lose credibility with your website visitors. People are more likely to buy products you personally recommend. If you don't have experience with the product, be sure to check out reviews to see what other people's experience with it is.
Hey Chris – great post. Just a question – We have got about 80 stores affiliated to Amazon Associates. As I understand from your article, it appears that the blog site is a foundation for making a successful Amazon Income. In this regard, we don’t have a blog site but we just have those stores (websites) which have a show case of products. What do you think the strategy would be to drive sales? Of course, we have got Social Media Marketing currently in place.

Thanks to your article, my anxiety and panic about getting started have vanished to a great extent. Coincidentally, this has come around the time when I had just purchased a PLR to WordPress tutorial which also came with an upsell that contained a course on Amazon promotion among others. I now also plan to purchase your course discussed here to that I can start setting my foot into the physical products affiliate marketing world.
I was following someone else’s guide and they said you should have a static front page, but I feel like I would be getting more views and more clicks if I had the opposite ie; my latest blogs on the homepage. I also checked my stats and when I link to an article/review people stay longer. When I link to the home page they don’t stay as long AND a higher bounce rate. My bounce rate for the homepage is literally 3,000 in the past month. They hit that homepage and stay for around 7 minutes which means most are probably reading the static page, but then they just… leave.

However, if you are looking to make money via Mechanical Turk, its easy to sign up and get started working.  You likely won't make a ton of money doing these simple tasks that often only pay 10 cents or so, but it could be an easy way to save up some money to start a business.  (I discussed saving up to start a business recently as a great way to go).
Armed with this knowledge you’d think that people would spend more time testing their theme or website layout to determine the optimal way to make money from their website right? Well, this is precisely why once you get your website to start earning ~$1,000 per month you should consider testing out a new theme. It doesn’t make sense to start testing theme changes or try moving to a new theme until you are making at least ~$1,000 per month.
My biggest frustration is how to drive my target to my site and links. I have to do YouTube videos as part of what I told the publisher I would do. I have cards in my YouTube videos to try to steer the traffic to my site where they can look at the offerings in a very organized fashion (which really is one of two places on the web that provide this for this publisher). I just want to work smarter instead of harder. I have had so many people thank me for the videos but it is not converting through the affiliate links. I can’t stop the YouTube videos because it is part of the agreement. Also posting the reviews on Amazon.com in the product reviews. I don’t think I can add a link to my site in product reviews.
Another cool way to essentially let Amazon pay you is to create an account at Snagshout. The site is completely free, and works by giving you access to a large marketplace of extremely discounted Amazon products, in exchange for an honest review of the discounted products you buy. We're talking discounts that range from 50% to 90% off the original retail price. Surprisingly, some of the items are actually free or only cost 99 cents. You simply shop like you normally would, then after the item arrives, you'll be asked to leave an honest review of the product. By doing so, you'll gain access to another plethora of highly discounted items. If used correctly, you'll be getting "paid" via huge discounts on items you'd hopefully be purchasing anyways.
You should tell your visitors that you receive a fee if they make a purchase through one of your affiliate links, but you must comply with the EU Associates Programme Operating Agreement (for example only, you cannot offer any person or entity any consideration or incentive for using the links or imply sponsorship or endorcement by a person or company).
It’s probably worth asking an account rep if you can add “nofollow” to those links and stay compliant. For SEO, it’s not worth worrying about probably. Google has said before that they handle things like this for affiliate programs on their end if the program is big enough (i.e. they have enough data to understand what is going on), and Amazon is the biggest in the world. That’s just my gut, though.
On July 5, 1994, Bezos initially incorporated the company in Washington State with the name Cadabra, Inc.[23] He later changed the name to Amazon.com, Inc. a few months later, after a lawyer misheard its original name as "cadaver".[24] In September 1994, Bezos purchased the URL Relentless.com and briefly considered naming his online store Relentless, but friends told him the name sounded a bit sinister. The domain is still owned by Bezos and still redirects to the retailer.[25][26]
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