Process-specific tutorials: You can also provide your readers with an in-depth process tutorial. For example, a DIY blog could write a tutorial blog post on “How to refinish an antique dresser” or a food-based blogger could describe “How to can your own tomatoes.” In each of these, all of the products you need to accomplish these outcomes would be links to Amazon.
The point of the service is to encourage you to leave reviews of the product. This typically is reserved for newly released products. They don’t have a huge amount of products, but they are at great prices. for instance, you can get a 3-piece stainless steel barbecue set for only $5. That’s about 80% off the price it would sell on Amazon. As noted, you get the price because you have to submit a product review on Amazon. Companies are spending money to reduce the price in order to get reviews. You have to be honest in your review.
Retail Arbitrage:  Of course, if garage sales or thrift stores aren’t your thing, there are many ways to make money.  I have also done retail arbitrage.  Where you buy clearance or discounted items and then sell them.  There are good profits in retail arbitrage, but it takes more capital to get started and it takes more skill.  Garage sales are still a great way to make money and learn in my opinion.

Thank you so much for this helpful information! I’m working on a blog that will be read by people in various countries. Will the links and credit work if someone, say, gets sent to the Amazon Japan store, but then transfers to the UK store and buys something there? Or would I have to guess which country stores the readers would use first, and have several links in my blog to all the various Amazon stores? How might I set this up most effectively?
Amazon actually does hire home-based virtual customer service reps regularly! Pay is around $11 an hour and the job is usually reserved for people living in specific states. You can go to the careers page on their main site to find these jobs, just do a search for “work at home” in the keyword field. You can also read the Amazon work at home customer service review I wrote for more info on how it works.
Goodreads is a "social cataloging" website founded in December 2006 and launched in January 2007 by Otis Chandler, a software engineer, and entrepreneur, and Elizabeth Chandler. The website allows individuals to freely search Goodreads' extensive user-populated database of books, annotations, and reviews. Users can sign up and register books to generate library catalogs and reading lists. They can also create their own groups of book suggestions and discussions. In December 2007, the site had over 650,000 members and over 10 million books had been added. Amazon bought the company in March 2013.[112]

Anyone can sign up for a baby registry. You get the biggest selection of products (Amazon’s selection is unmatched), along with easy 90-day returns, mobile registry, and discounts/rewards only for baby registry owners. Amazon even has a tool that allows you to add items you can’t find on their site to you registry. It’s basically a universal baby registry!

It's easy to forget these days, but there was a time when Amazon didn't – and couldn't – promise that an order would arrive by a certain date. Mike helped change that. "We totally overhauled the way we make promises on the website," he says. "We got rid of the 'usually ships in 24 hours' messaging. We developed the capability to make these aggressive delivery estimates and keep them. In many ways, this was what Prime was born of."
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