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Just like their subscribe and save program, Amazon Family allows you to save 20% off diaper subscriptions. This means you pick your favorite diaper brand and have Amazon deliver them right to your door at regular intervals. It’s just that easy. So basically, it’s Amazon’s subscribe and save with an extra 5% added on top. If you’re already a Prime member, then you can sign up for Amazon Family here.
It’s easiest to make money using Amazon’s affiliate program if the people coming to your website are looking for a specific product that your website discusses. It’s more difficult to use a website like my blog here and make money linking to physical products because the people coming here are looking for advice on how to earn money online – not what iPod speakers they should buy.
After finding your blog, a couple weeks ago, I finally setup a carousel on one of my blogs. After reading your blog, I had a bunch of different ideas on how to use my Amazon affiliate account across a handful of my blogs but as of April 15th, Amazon is closing the affiliate program for all Illinois residents. The Illinois governor signed a tax law that requires Amazon to charge tax on affiliate sales in Illinois even if the retailer doesn’t have a presence here.
As a blogger, I love the Amazon affiliate program. As an affiliate, aka Associate, you earn a commission on every sale you refer to the site. While many complain the rates are low, they do offer a progressive earnings structure on most general merchandise. The more you sell, the more you earn – from 4% to 8.5%. Amazon also has several “Bounty” opportunities where you can earn a set fee of $3 to $25 for referring people to sign up for Prime, Amazon Student, Audible, Baby & Wedding Registries and more.
I’m now looking to set up a niche site in the next month or so to better leverage the program and your advice. And, of course collectively, this should help on the commission rate. I’ve been at 6.5% and hoping this month I may hit 7%. But, the key issue is that the avg sale is low (no surprise given what I’m promoting) so hopefully, this new site will help with this and diversify my efforts.

One thing I do is have websites that are set up in lower competition niches where the items typically aren’t as expensive and where it’s easier to sell these products in larger quantities ($50 or less). Then I have other niche sites that sell more expensive products at much higher prices ($XXX – $X,XXX) that are sold less frequently. So this way I get to use the increased quantity of sales from these lower priced product websites to help me get up into higher payout brackets so instead of making 6% on that high end item I’ll get 8% instead.

Thank you so much for this helpful information! I’m working on a blog that will be read by people in various countries. Will the links and credit work if someone, say, gets sent to the Amazon Japan store, but then transfers to the UK store and buys something there? Or would I have to guess which country stores the readers would use first, and have several links in my blog to all the various Amazon stores? How might I set this up most effectively?
In 2015, Amazon surpassed Walmart as the most valuable retailer in the United States by market capitalization.[12] Amazon is the third most valuable public company in the United States (behind Apple and Microsoft),[13] the largest Internet company by revenue in the world, and after Walmart, the second largest employer in the United States.[14] In 2017, Amazon acquired Whole Foods Market for $13.4 billion, which vastly increased Amazon's presence as a brick-and-mortar retailer.[15] The acquisition was interpreted by some as a direct attempt to challenge Walmart's traditional retail stores.[16]
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