The shipping thing drives me nuts. It takes significantly longer for me to get anything from Amazon (WEEKS if I choose free shipping) than everyone else. Why? Because I live in a high crime area and want everything shipped to my p.o. box. I recently placed and order and chose “free shipping” because the delivery date was one day earlier than had I chosen the paid ship option – until I got to the end, whereupon my new ship date was an additional FIVE DAYS later. Get a p.o. box and try it and you’ll quickly see I’m not lying. We’re punished. Amazon whines a lot about combating thievery (let us in your house, let us in your car) but they’re strangely silent on p.o. boxes, the absolute safest option available to anyone. What’s THAT about?! I work at the USPS plant where my p.o. box is and my box is literally twenty steps from where the Amazon packages are processed – if Amazon would just ship the ****** thing out! Keep checking my phone but, nope, it STILL hasn’t shipped. Btw, USPS and FedEx have a business relationship so they can’t blame it on that. For this reason, Prime was a joke so I cancelled. And because Amazon always wanted additional money from me for every movie I wanted to watch. Kind of defeats the point. Couldn’t see any benefit to having it.
Amazon has fought back against unionization campaigns in the past. When a small group of maintenance and repair technicians moved to unionize at a Delaware Amazon warehouse in 2014, the company hired a law firm that specializes in opposing organized labor. The employees eventually voted not to join the International Association of Machinists and Aerospace Workers.
As of March 1st, that standard will be replaced with a new category-by-category system. That means affiliates selling products in certain favored categories will get higher rates, including “digital video games” and “luxury beauty,” while most products see a steep drop-off. Amazon says the changes were made to simplify the system and that most associates will come out ahead, although it’s unclear how to square those predictions with the falling rates.

"The longer you're here, and the more you build, and the more you collaborate, the more you become personally passionate about our mission," says Mike Bundy, who started out in a temp job stacking pallets at Amazon's first fulfillment center in 1997. Today, he manages a 300-person software organization. "I feel like a founder of the company. I feel a great deal of personal pride in what we’ve done."
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