It's easy to forget these days, but there was a time when Amazon didn't – and couldn't – promise that an order would arrive by a certain date. Mike helped change that. "We totally overhauled the way we make promises on the website," he says. "We got rid of the 'usually ships in 24 hours' messaging. We developed the capability to make these aggressive delivery estimates and keep them. In many ways, this was what Prime was born of."
Amazon’s labor practices, as well as the government incentives the company has received, also face growing scrutiny from some lawmakers. In September, Vermont senator Bernie Sanders introduced legislation called the Stop BEZOS Act, which is designed to encourage large employers to raise wages by taxing them when employees are forced to rely on public benefits like food stamps. The bill was accompanied by a campaign that encouraged Amazon workers to share their experiences of working at the company. Shortly after the legislation was introduced, Amazon announced it was raising its minimum wage to $15 for all US employees.
"The longer you're here, and the more you build, and the more you collaborate, the more you become personally passionate about our mission," says Mike Bundy, who started out in a temp job stacking pallets at Amazon's first fulfillment center in 1997. Today, he manages a 300-person software organization. "I feel like a founder of the company. I feel a great deal of personal pride in what we’ve done."
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