Classify, manage, and report on your data using features, such as: S3 Storage Class Analysis to analyze access patterns; S3 Lifecycle policies to transfer objects to lower-cost storage classes; S3 Cross-Region Replication to replicate data into other regions; S3 Object Lock to apply retention dates to objects and protect them from deletion; and S3 Inventory to get visbility into your stored objects, their metadata, and encryption status. You can also use S3 Batch Operations to change object properties and perform storage management tasks for billions of objects. Since Amazon S3 works with AWS Lambda, you can log activities, define alerts, and automate workflows without managing additional infrastructure.

Throughout the summer of 2018, Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders criticized Amazon's wages and working conditions in a series of YouTube videos and media appearances. He also pointed to the fact that Amazon had paid no federal income tax in the previous year.[198] Sanders solicited stories from Amazon warehouse workers who felt exploited by the company.[199] One such story, by James Bloodworth, described the environment as akin to "a low-security prison" and stated that the company's culture used an Orwellian newspeak.[200] These reports cited a finding by New Food Economy that one third of fulfilment center workers in Arizona were on the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP).[201] Responses by Amazon included incentives for employees to tweet positive stories and a statement which called the salary figures used by Sanders "inaccurate and misleading". The statement also charged that it was inappropriate for him to refer to SNAP as "food stamps".[199] On September 5, 2018, Sanders along with Ro Khanna introduced the Stop Bad Employers by Zeroing Out Subsidies (Stop BEZOS) Act aimed at Amazon and other alleged beneficiaries of corporate welfare such as Wal-mart, McDonald's and Uber.[202] Among the bill's supporters were Tucker Carlson of Fox News and Matt Taibbi who criticized himself and other journalists for not covering Amazon's contribution to wealth inequality earlier.[203][204]
"The longer you're here, and the more you build, and the more you collaborate, the more you become personally passionate about our mission," says Mike Bundy, who started out in a temp job stacking pallets at Amazon's first fulfillment center in 1997. Today, he manages a 300-person software organization. "I feel like a founder of the company. I feel a great deal of personal pride in what we’ve done."
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