This was a very informative book on identifying stocks before they make big moves. It's a great book for someone who knows a little about stocks, but would like to dive deeper into why they move up in price and what to look for. The first 100 pages (chapter 1) was nothing but stock charts and I can see why they are their, but I think that 100 pages was a bit much. I would suggest looking at the first 10 or so charts and then proceed to chapter two. Then once you've read further into it and understand how to read charts better, take a look back at the chapter 1 and apply what you've learned. Once you get past the writers incessant plugging of his IBD website, there really is some very helpful information in this book about the stock market.
Amazon employs a multi-level e-commerce strategy. Amazon started by focusing on business-to-consumer relationships between itself and its customers and business-to-business relationships between itself and its suppliers and then moved to facilitate customer-to-customer with the Amazon marketplace which acts as an intermediary to facilitate transactions. The company lets anyone sell nearly anything using its platform. In addition to an affiliate program that lets anyone post-Amazon links and earn a commission on click-through sales, there is now a program which lets those affiliates build entire websites based on Amazon's platform.[161]
While the East African workers face unique challenges stemming from language barriers and religious practices, the issues they cite about Amazon’s workload pressures are widespread. Several Amazon employees have spoken up over the past few months about what life is like inside the warehouses that ship nearly half of all e-commerce purchases in the US.
Over the summer, a group of East African Amazon workers in the Minneapolis area began negotiating with Amazon to make compromises around Ramadan holiday hours, better responding to worker complaints, and building a dedicated prayer space in the Shakopee fulfillment center. Unsatisfied with the pace of progress toward improving working conditions, the group rallied a few hundred people, including local teamster chapters, to the Shakopee facility parking lot Friday afternoon to demand that Amazon reduce productivity rates to safe levels, respect the cultural differences of Muslim East Africans, and invest in a community fund to aid in affordable housing for workers.
According to an August 8, 2018 story in Bloomberg Businessweek, Amazon has about a 5 percent share of U.S. retail spending (excluding cars and car parts and visits to restaurants and bars), and a 43.5 share of American online spending in 2018. The forecast is for Amazon to own 49 percent of the total American online spending in 2018, with two-thirds of Amazon's revenue coming from the U.S.[53]
What? Isn’t Amazon just a place where you can buy new stuff? It’s not any longer! Now, there is Amazon Handmade, where you can sell your hand crafted items to Amazon customers (there is a 12% referral fee). It doesn’t matter what type of crafting you are into, if you make it, you can sell it there. Amazon is hoping to be the next Etsy and more. You don’t even need to use professional photos or product UPC’s.

For Mike, who got married and became a dad during his almost two decades at Amazon, ownership isn't just about getting work done; it's about leaving work behind and recharging with family. "I manage my schedule really aggressively," he says. "If you let your calendar get filled up with non-essential stuff, you're not owning your career, and you're not owning your path. You can be scrappy. You can be entrepreneurial. You don't have to give up your personal life."
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