Hey Courtney, I haven’t had any websites impacted with the update actually. I also don’t really even think about or care about keyword density in my articles either. My recommendation is to remember that Google’s goal is to provide the best search results and if your goal is to make a website that is genuinely better than the website currently ranking in the first position that the rest will follow (particularly if you’re going after an authority website approach)
You should put that you’re a participant of Amazon’s affiliate program somewhere on your website. But do people know when they’re clicking a link if it’s an affiliate link or not? Depends on if they look at the entire URL string or if you tell them. Frankly I think as long as you’re providing value for the reader and as long as you put the Amazon disclosure in your blog post then that is good.

Great article! I need to go back to your post many more times for it to properly go in and for me to understand. Sorry if my question is a strange one. I am quite new to the whole concept of amazon affiliate marketing. When we are advertising their products, do we spend any money ourselves? Or we are just middle wares advertising their product? In what case, we have to have inventory? Can we sell products in Amazon?
You wouldn’t install the same Google Analytics code on every single website you own right? Of course not, because you wouldn’t be able to tell how much traffic each of your websites were receiving individually. So the same thing can be said for tracking the money you make on your websites (and yet people still tell me they use only one Amazon tracking ID for all of their websites /facepalm). In the ,past I’ve gone so far as to create 15 different tracking ID’s for use on a single website.
One possibility is to use different tracking IDs. Of these you can generate up to 100. To do this, you can simply generate a new tracking ID and assign it to only one Amazon Affiliate link on your website. In the statistics of the different tracking IDs, you can then see which and how often each of the links were clicked and how many products were purchased through them.
Want up to 15% off items you normally buy each and every week? Then you need to be a part of Amazon’s subscribe and save program! Yes, this little gem allows you to subscribe to a bunch of products you normally buy (think everyday items), but save money on top of it. Subscribe and Save sends out products to you on a regular basis. You choose what products you want delivered and when each month. Amazon will do the rest.
Thank you so much for this helpful information! I’m working on a blog that will be read by people in various countries. Will the links and credit work if someone, say, gets sent to the Amazon Japan store, but then transfers to the UK store and buys something there? Or would I have to guess which country stores the readers would use first, and have several links in my blog to all the various Amazon stores? How might I set this up most effectively?
In his fulfillment center days, when Amazon still had a lot of technological growing pains, Mike was always the guy popping into the tech room to ask, "How can we help?" His curiosity and commitment led to relationships with mentors who helped him follow his newfound passion and transform himself from an art-school grad into a leader of projects that truly reinvent the customer experience.
×